Glue Store – Miranda Sydney

Image Gallery

Shopfront modularity inspired by Tetris.

Design Clarity has joined forces with the Glue team to create a new and dynamic visual identity for their stores, offering urban street fashion and lifestyle accessories galore. There’s a retro record bar ‘Vinyl Richie’, a Denham tailoring pop-up box for denim customisation and a shop-in-shop concept for Article No.1 menswear.

An umbrella retail brand identity has been established with a focus on strong retail customer experience. As an iconic hero tenancy within the latest Westfield development Glue store sits in an island location occupying 487sqm and has an immense 57-lineal-metres of shopfront. This expanse of shopfront drove the design direction, breaking up the space into a 1x1M module, approaching each zone like a game of Tetris.

A mixture of texture and finishes sees concrete, industrial fixturing, recycled doors & LED lights work together, alongside standout colourful mural collaborations with local artists.

Our tested retail strategy of Attract>Interact>Transact plays out well with the customer journey winding through a myriad of creative island fixtures to a bold, graphically illuminated service counter.

A huge feature is the collaborative work of various up-and-coming artists like Anya Brock’s it-girl featured on the painted brickwork shopfront, as well as graffiti artwork by Glue store staff and Shire locals.

The fitting rooms have a dramatic black painted rough sawn timber cladding, adding a moody ambience to this more intimate zone, with the internals reversed out in white to make trying on clothes easy behind the reclaimed and stripped timber doors.

Glue store is a true collaboration involving many passionate, creative minds and cutting edge ideas. The artists are selected carefully for their work and amazing talents rather than their fame. There’s also a requirement to encourage interaction from the local community and the collaborative streetart pieces allow for a stronger connection between staff and customer. The interior architecture needs to accommodate the ever-changing vision of the visual merchandising team. The space needs to act as a backdrop for many brands with the key retail departments of mens, womens, footwear, fitting, and sales working hard to co-exist smoothly in a chaotic and visually loud environment.